Skip to main content

Day 24 - Wiggins, MS to Mobile, AL



We had a very early start (6:40 a.m.) to try to beat the afternoon rain and thunderstorm.

Even though neither Mississippi nor Alabama’s DOT’s believe in shoulders, we had the best day ever!  We had a wonderful day in the saddle – everyone’s legs are accustomed to 88 mile jaunts with 2,000 feet of vertical.  We enjoyed open country roads with no traffic.

We had lots of dog encounters which included further sprint training and water bottle sprays and our pepper spray was not utilized, yet.  Some of the dogs wouldn’t give up – we had a few that chased us upwards of 300 – 400 yards!  The really scary encounters are when the dogs don’t bark at all, they come up on us stealthy-like and we have to begin our sprint when we luckily see them out of the corner of our eye.
We crossed into our seventh state, Alabama, at mid-day with little fanfair, just the obligatory boarder photo and then back in the saddle to try to beat the impending afternoon thunderstorm.

We did get rained on this afternoon, but we beat the big thunderstorm by about 20 minutes, which came just after we arrived in Mobile.

We showered and then met my sister and brother-in-law, Joanie and Dale Grant, for dinner.  Joanie and Dale graciously drove 5(+) hours from Atlanta to meet the team for dinner in Mobile, AL.  We had a wonderful dinner at Dauphene’s and enjoyed 3 of the 4 bottles of wine that they brought for the occasion.  Enjoying their wine tonight was a real treat; we will see how this goes for tomorrow’s early morning start!  Thanks very much Joanie and Dale for making time for this brief reunion and a wonderful dinner!

The team at Dauphene’s was fantastic and surprised us with a special dessert plate and message for the rest of the RAA.  Thanks Dauphene’s for a great evening and the well wishes.


Baptist Church count at 80.

Popular posts from this blog

The Ride Across America

This has been a “bucket list” item of mine for over 10 years.Not 10 years in the planning, I just put it on the list about 10 years ago.Well, this ride, like many bucket list items has a “window of opportunity,” a window which I believe may close sometime after my 60th birthday.
So, enter Bob McCullough and Joe Geivett, two of my best friends and two guys who also have much longer bucket lists than mine.They added the RAA to their lists about a year and a half ago.
There are seven fairly well-known routes to ride a bicycle across America.We are taking the southernmost route (see map below) San Diego, California to St. Augustine, Florida.We selected this route mainly because of the time of the year we are riding and the weather window that the southern route presents in late August through September.Our planned dates to ride are September 4th – October 4th.We will ride an average of about 100 – 110 miles a day.Depending on which map you look at and the course we ultimately select each…

Day 1 is Complete!

Thanks very much for following us on this journey across America. Day one began with the ritual of dipping our rear wheels in the Pacific Ocean at a "24 hour open beach" in San Diego---who knew beaches had hours?  Thereafter we winded our way through the outskirts of San Diego and got to Highway 80 which took us to Alpine and Pine Valley. Note to self, any town called Alpine is likely in the mountains and is to be avoided when riding your bikein 90 degree weather, with a road temperature of about 96 degrees!

We traversed about 7500' feet of vertical today in about 63 miles. Not the 100 miles a day average we had planned throughout but today's course was a 4.5 on our 1-5 scale of difficulty on our spreadsheet. (We don't have any "5's" because we did not want to get in our heads with the difficulty of a "5" riding day! In hindsight, today was a 5.)
Only one mechanical, a busted gear cable and Kennan was able to rectify the situation in quick fas…

Day 2

Post by Eric Pilsk:  Day 2 of the RAA was a day of contrasts and surprises.  We started in Pine Valley, CA (note to self for when we do this next time--right like that is going to happen any time soon....anyway, the note, don't end the day in a valley---it just means that you start the next day with a tough climb.) Pine Valley is  just over 4,000 feet and as the sun was rising the temperatures were in the low to mid 40s.  We ended the day after 106 miles at about 100 feet above sea level, after dipping below sea level for a while, with a blazing sun heating up to about 110 and with road temps at 114-115.  We went from shivering to baking over the course of the day.
Among the days surprises were much more climbing in the first 30 miles than we expected, a 10 mile descent on the shoulder of I-8 that was exhilarating and mildly terrifying (high wind warnings for the semi's and a 6% plus down hill grade! Some on the team enjoyed this speedy down hill and in the second segment of a …